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Volunteers Needed to Interpret at the 2022 Winter Meeting – Spanish and Turkish to English

 

The Winter Meeting will be held from January 27th to 30th, 2022 at the Hyatt Regency Tamaya Resort and Spa in Santa Ana Pueblo, NM.

Volunteers will be able to sign up for time slots to interpret for our non-English speakers during the conference. Interpretation to English during panel presentations will be required for Spanish and Turkish. Interpreters will also be asked to shadow our non-English speaking guests to interpret from English to Spanish or Turkish.

As compensation, volunteers will either: 

1) be awarded an SWS membership and registration for the Meeting, for which a minimum of 8 hours interpretation commitment divided into two days will be required, or 

2) be compensated at a rate of $30 per hour, for which a minimum of 4 hours interpretation commitment will be required.

Volunteers can sign up until December 15th, 2021. 

Visit www.socwomen.org/winter-meeting-2022/ for more information.

If interested, please email: villalon.sws.presidency@gmail.com. 

SWS Interpreter Flyer

Revised SWS 2022 Winter Meeting COVID-19 Health and Safety Protocols – December 22, 2021

SWS 2022 Winter Meeting

COVID-19 Health and Safety Protocols

December 22, 2021

We have modified these protocols upon consultation with our legal team and updated CDC Guidelines.

SWS is carefully monitoring recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and others regarding the COVID-19 situation as we plan for the 2022 SWS Winter Meeting in Santa Ana Pueblo, New Mexico. Meeting attendees will be required to follow all health and safety protocols mandated at the time of the meeting.

We are dedicated to ensuring our attendees have a healthy and safe meeting experience. Based on current information, we are implementing the following protocols:

  1. Vaccinations are a mandated requirement for participation in the 2022 SWS Winter Meeting. We are collecting proof of vaccination from our attendees in our 2022 Winter Meeting Registration form.
  2. COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shots are highly recommended in accordance with CDC Guidelines.
  3. Exemption requests can be sent to swseo.barretkatuna@outlook.com to be reviewed. If approved, proof of a negative COVID-19 test result within 72 hours prior to arrival to Santa Ana Pueblo, New Mexico will be required for non-vaccinated attendees.
  4. We understand that minors under the age of 5 years of age who may be participating in our childcare programming are not presently eligible for vaccines. As soon as this changes, we will announce our policy in this regard.
  5. International travelers must follow CDC Travel Guidelines.
  6. According to the latest guidelines of the CDC and New Mexico, we will have a strict mask policy in all indoor public spaces of the meeting hotel. Masks that completely cover your nose and mouth and fit snugly are expected to be worn by all individuals in accordance with CDC recommendations. Check this link for further information on masks. For those who are immunocompromised or who have exemption from the mandate, they will be asked to wear masks both in indoor and outdoor public spaces. The use of masks outdoors by fully vaccinated attendees will be left to their best judgment.
  7. Social distancing will be recommended. Seating will be set up accordingly for all indoor and outdoor events, including receptions and SWS organized meals so when masks are taken off to eat or drink, we will still be distanced.
  8. The hotel staff will follow strict health and safety protocols, and the audiovisual support team will ensure cleanliness of microphones and other equipment.
  9. Hand sanitizing stations will be set up throughout the event spaces. Moreover, attendees must follow thorough hand washing CDC recommendations.
  10. Childcare services and lactation rooms will follow similarly strict health and safety policies.
  11. Meeting attendees are asked to sign a COVID-19 waiver that will be part of the 2022 SWS Winter Meeting Registration form.

We will all play a role in keeping our meeting as safe as possible, so we expect attendees to be responsible and caring, including when leaving the hotel. If adjustments must be made due to changes reported by the CDC, we will communicate them promptly.

Please share any questions with SWS Executive Officer, Barret Katuna, at swseo.barretkatuna@outlook.com.

 

 

2021 SWS Election Results – New Officers to Begin Their Terms at the 2022 Winter Meeting, January 27-30, 2022

Congratulations to the Newly Elected SWS Officers!

President-Elect – Melanie Heath and Mary Osirim

Secretary – hara bastas

Treasurer-Elect – Rodica Lisnic

Parliamentarian – Chloe Bird

Awards Committee Chair – Maria Cecilia Hwang

Academic Justice Committee Co-Chairs – Andrea Hunt and LaTonya J. Trotter

Sister to Sister Committee Co-Chair – Pallavi Banerjee

International Committee Chair – Fumilayo Showers

Awards Committee Members – Saida Grundy and Shobha Hamal Gurung

Membership Committee Members – Miriam Abelson and Christobel Asiedu

Nominations Committee Members – Jaime Hartless and Baker A. Rogers

Publications Committee Members – Andrea “Drea” S. Boyles and Chaitanya Lakkimsetti

Student Representative-Elect –  MaryAnn Salinas-Vega

Career Development Committee Co-Chair – Mindy Fried

Social Action Committee Co-Chair – Heather R. Hlavka 

Thank you to all of the Nominations Committee Members including Josephine Beoku-Betts (Chair and Past President), Tristan Bridges, Maria Cecilia Hwang, Manashi Ray, and Ranita Ray for all of their work in putting together such a wonderful group of candidates for elected office.

SWS Remembers Pauline Bart

Photo of Pauline Bart (Photo taken by Christine Williams at the SWS 2015 Winter Meeting)

Click HERE for Pauline Bart’s obituary that appeared in The New York Times on October 30, 2021

Another link to Pauline’s obituary from The New York Times:

https://edition.pagesuite.com/popovers/dynamic_article_popover.aspx?artguid=e2d1868d-3041-495e-a55f-8e3fa984a345&appid=1165

Click HERE for Pauline Bart’s obituary in The Washington Post from November 2, 2021

Link: https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/pauline-bart-dead/2021/11/02/8b14f1a2-3b1b-11ec-bfad-8283439871ec_story.html

Please contact Melissa D. Day, SWS Network News Editor at: swsnewsletter@socwomen.org if you’d like to share your memories of Pauline in a tribute that we will be publishing in the Winter 2021 Issue of Network News.

 

Overlooked Sports, Overlooked Fans – A Sociological Reflection on Women’s College Basketball Fandom

By: Mairead Carr, PhD Candidate, University at Albany – SUNY

Keywords: gender, basketball, fan culture, women’s sports, media

The dearth of sports coverage of women’s sports is well documented. Even the way we talk about women’s sports trivializes women athletes and their achievements. Yet, at the start of every basketball season, I continue to reflect on my experiences growing up with a love of the University of Connecticut’s women’s basketball team as they became one of the greatest dynasties in sports history. For those who are not sports fans, the UConn women Huskies accumulated 11 national championships and 22 conference tournament wins between their time in the Big East and American Athletic Conferences since 1995. Given that the women were successful, often even greater than the UConn men, I think about the possible effect this had on me and, as a sociologist, I consider the effects they may have had on not just girls but children of women’s college basketball across the state. Still, I also consider what the lack of coverage means not only for women’s teams, but for the fans of these teams.

Although people argue individual interest drives reporting and news coverage that overlooks the impact that culture and institutions have on media representation, the fans of women’s sports, like women’s college basketball, remain passionate and loyal. When I was growing up in the 1990s and early 2000s, the UConn women’s basketball team dominated the sport. Going to games or watching them play live on television was a family event. We rarely missed a game and even persuaded family members, much to their chagrin, to turn on the Huskies when we were at holiday parties. We witnessed heartbreaking losses and nail-biting wins during that time. We were loyal and dedicated fans. 

My family didn’t even let a lack of visual media keep us from supporting the team. While traveling back from a trip to Montana in 2011, my dad and I caught what we could of our beloved Huskies losing in the Final Four to a rival – Notre Dame – on the radio as we were shuttled back to our car at the airport. Following this team is a way of life, and our devoted following of our Huskies is something we share with women’s college basketball fans across the country. Yet women’s sports, and as a result, their large network of fans, are often overlooked. People are not just watching women’s college basketball because they could not get tickets to a men’s game – they love this sport and love their women’s teams. 

Examples of this passion abound. Two years ago, my parents gifted me with the opportunity to see the Sweet Sixteen and Elite Eight games played in Albany, NY so I could see my Huskies in person again. Since starting a PhD program in sociology, I have not been able to attend games or watch them, which was an at least twice-weekly occasion that took on almost a religious commitment to me up until this point in my life. When we arrived in our seats, a family next to us said that they were Notre Dame fans but that they could not afford to go to Chicago where their team was playing. Still, they didn’t want to miss the chance to attend the tournament, so they paid to attend games in this section of the bracket to see other teams play instead.

When we downplay, or outright refuse to cover, a sport, a player, or a team, we minimize the achievements and the excellence of that sport, player, or team. And the issue is not all about marketing because we also dismiss fans of these sports as illustrated in many conversations about women’s sports. For example, when my husband told a friend that he was going with me and my family to the women’s college basketball Sweet Sixteen and Elite Eight games with my family a few years ago, his friend said, “why would you do that?” The insinuation being that the women’s team wasn’t worth the time, money, and effort we put in to go to the games. 

There are always other factors at play other than sexism, but what angers me about our collective mistreatment of women’s basketball teams, and comments made by the public such as “nobody cares” when ESPN, on rare occasions, reports on women’s sports news, is not only how severely we devalue the hard work these athletes put in to perfect their game but also how much it devalues their fans. 

I cannot discount the impact that growing up in an era when women’s college basketball came into its own, when rivalries were berthed and legends were made, had on me. I am sure girls in Tennessee who followed Pat Summitt’s leadership, in New Jersey who idolized C. Vivian Stringer’s teams, and others across the country who saw the athletes that women could be feel the same as I do today about the mistreatment of women’s college basketball players, their teams, and the lack of coverage about their accomplishments.

I was just two years old when the UConn Women’s Basketball team won their first NCAA Championship, and growing up, they were foundational to my desire to play basketball, but I believe they also shaped who I believed I could be. As a sociologist, I understand why this disregard of women’s sports persists, but as I reflect on the young girl that I was growing up in the shadow of one of the greatest dynasties to ever leave its mark on sports, I feel even more strongly that we have a social responsibility to address our trenchant failure to support women’s sports. 

As sociologists, we also need to examine the role women’s sports has on its fans and the ways in which we make sense of their accomplishments and failures, including at the high school level. How does the supremacy of girls’ teams at some schools, such as at my high school, shape the way people think about gender, if at all? If we know that women are often seen as inauthentic sports fans, how do fans of women’s sports navigate “fandom” and “fan culture?” Scholarship considers the role of women players in gaming communities, in the music industry, and in other cultural arenas. But what how do women, who are seen as inauthentic fans, navigating fandom of sports also deemed “inferior?” What is the experience like for men who are fans of women’s college basketball or women’s sports in general? We must consider the role of fandom for fans of women’s sports, an area that receives less focus than how women sports fans engage in fan culture in general.

As consumers, we need to do more to advocate for coverage of women’s sports because it matters not only to the ways we think about sports, but I can personally say it also matters to young girls who are yearning to see themselves, and their icons represented in the way men’s teams are. It is no longer enough to say that these leagues do not have fans. For sports like women’s college basketball, the National Women’s Soccer League, and others, the interest and fandom is already there. It is time we recognize them.

Mairead Carr is a PhD Candidate in Sociology at the University at Albany – SUNY. She received her Master of Arts from the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at the University at Albany – SUNY in 2019. Her dissertation research addresses how individual choices resist and/or maintain systemic inequalities in education by examining school choice and parental decision-making with the case of inter-district magnet schools in Hartford, Connecticut.

Today, Wednesday, October 20th, 2021 is International Pronouns Day

Credit to Sharon McCutcheon for this image.

________________________________________________________________

Today, Wednesday, October 20th, 2021 is International Pronouns Day. 

What is it?

International Pronouns Day is an opportunity to educate ourselves and others about the importance of using the pronouns that an individual identifies as reflecting their gender identity. Secondly, it supports the work we do to normalize sharing and using pronouns.

“International Pronouns Day seeks to make respecting, sharing, and educating about personal pronouns commonplace.”  – International Pronouns Day Website 

Why is it important?

I cannot say it better than the IPD website already does: “We think [using someone’s chosen pronouns is] common courtesy and basic to human dignity to do so, like calling someone by their name.”

What Are Pronouns” (video) 

How can I participate?

You can read and share the resources below or, for other suggestions on how you can participate, visit the International Pronouns Day website

In order to normalize sharing pronouns, we need more than one day! While participating today is important, be sure to use the following resources to sustain the work around normalizing pronouns.

Below are some resources: 

https://pronounsday.org/

https://www.mypronouns.org/

Sociologists for Trans Justice Compiled Best Practices for Promoting Trans Inclusion on Campus

#PronounsDay

Erin Baker-Giese, she/her

SWS Media Relations Committee Chair

__

SWS 2022 Winter Meeting COVID-19 Health and Safety Protocols with Vaccine Mandate – Revised November 3, 2021

SWS 2022 Winter Meeting

COVID-19 Health and Safety Protocols

November 3, 2021

We have modified these protocols upon consultation with our legal team and updated CDC Guidelines.

SWS is carefully monitoring recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and others regarding the COVID-19 situation as we plan for the 2022 SWS Winter Meeting in Santa Ana Pueblo, New Mexico. Meeting attendees will be required to follow all health and safety protocols mandated at the time of the meeting.

We are dedicated to ensuring our attendees have a healthy and safe meeting experience. Based on current information, we are implementing the following protocols:

  1. Vaccinations are a mandated requirement for participation in the 2022 SWS Winter Meeting. We will be collecting proof of vaccination from our attendees in our 2022 Winter Meeting Registration form.
  2. Exemption requests can be sent to swseo.barretkatuna@outlook.com to be reviewed. If approved, proof of a negative COVID-19 test result within 72 hours prior to arrival to Santa Ana Pueblo, New Mexico will be required for non-vaccinated attendees.
  3. We understand that minors under the age of 12 years of age who may be participating in our childcare programming are not presently eligible for vaccines. As soon as this changes, we will announce our policy in this regard.
  4. International travelers must follow CDC Travel Guidelines.
  5. According to the latest guidelines of the CDC and New Mexico, we will have a strict mask policy in all indoor public spaces of the meeting hotel. Masks that completely cover your nose and mouth and fit snugly are expected to be worn by all individuals in accordance with CDC recommendations. Check this link for further information on masks. For those who are immunocompromised or who have exemption from the mandate, they will be asked to wear masks both in indoor and outdoor public spaces. The use of masks outdoors by fully vaccinated attendees will be left to their best judgment.
  6. Social distancing will be recommended. Seating will be set up accordingly for all indoor and outdoor events, including receptions and SWS organized meals so when masks are taken off to eat or drink, we will still be distanced.
  7. The hotel staff will follow strict health and safety protocols, and the audiovisual support team will ensure cleanliness of microphones and other equipment.
  8. Hand sanitizing stations will be set up throughout the event spaces. Moreover, attendees must follow thorough hand washing CDC recommendations.
  9. Childcare services and lactation rooms will follow similarly strict health and safety policies.
  10. Meeting attendees will be asked to sign a COVID-19 waiver that will be part of the 2022 SWS Winter Meeting Registration form.

We will all play a role in keeping our meeting as safe as possible, so we expect attendees to be responsible and caring, including when leaving the hotel. If adjustments must be made due to changes reported by the CDC, we will communicate them promptly.

Please share any questions with SWS Executive Officer, Barret Katuna, at swseo.barretkatuna@outlook.com.

 

 

SWS Members – Vote Today in the SWS Election – Voting System Closes on Sunday, October 31, 2021 at 11:59 pm EDT (Extended Deadline)

The 2021 SWS Election is now open!

Here is the link to the ballot: https://sws.memberclicks.net/2021swselection

The next elected SWS Officers will begin their service to SWS at the 2022 SWS Winter Meeting.

On the ballot, there is also an opportunity to vote on amendments that SWS Council communicated to you in September.

The voting system will close on Sunday, October 31 at 11:59 pm Eastern Time. (Extended Deadline) 

The Nominations Committee would like to thank everyone who agreed to run for office. We have a strong, diverse, and representative slate of candidates and we look forward to their leadership of SWS moving forward. We strongly encourage all registered SWS members to play their own part by participating in the election process and by voting for their preferred candidates.

SWS Nominations Committee

Josephine Beoku-Betts, Chair and Past President

Tristan Bridges

Maria Cecilia Hwang

Manashi Ray

Ranita Ray