SWS Letter to Wright State University Regarding Contract Negotiation Impasse

January 25, 2019

President Cheryl Schrader and Members of the Board of Trustees of Wright State University:

Dear Colleagues at Wright State University,

We write in support of our faculty colleagues at Wright State University on behalf of Sociologists for Women in Society (SWS), an international organization of over 600 sociologists and publisher of the highly respected academic journal Gender & Society.  We are contacting you regarding the contract negotiations impasse that led faculty to go on strike.  We wish to express our sincere hope that the University will work to achieve a fair and expeditious resolution to this troubling situation.

SWS was formed in 1971 to promote activism, scholarship, and education that improves the lives of women in all walks of life. We have been especially active in supporting the professional and academic careers of women and of gender scholarship in colleges and universities.  Current scholarship in the social sciences and education consistently shows that women and members of minority groups face unique challenges to their professional success in academia.  We also know that unions work hard to decrease inequalities among faculty. The Board of Trustees’ decision might impact women and people of color disproportionately for economic reasons such as fewer assets and safety net savings.

We strongly support human rights, democracy, and scientific research, and we believe that colleges and universities should assume prominent roles in civil political discourses and policy decisions that are vital to the welfare of the nation—especially when it comes to promoting social justice.  On a daily basis, however, faculty educate and enrich the lives of students. Faculty and students are certainly the heart of every university.

For these reasons, we hope that this contract negotiation impasse is resolved promptly and amicably, in a way that demonstrates the crucial role faculty play in fulfilling the University’s mission and guaranteeing academic excellence. Furthermore, we urge Wright State University to work with faculty to clarify any misunderstandings or prejudgments that recent events may have caused and to guarantee a fair and respectful work environment for the future.

Sincerely,

SWS President, Adia Harvey Wingfield, Ph.D.

SWS President, Tiffany Taylor, Ph.D.

SWS Past President, Abby Ferber, Ph.D.

Sex-Typed Chores and the City: Gender, Urbanicity, and Housework – Article in Gender & Society by Natasha Quadlin and Long Doan

Sex-Typed Chores and the City: Gender, Urbanicity, and Housework

January 17, 2019
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Media Contact:
Contact: Sheila B. Lalwani
Sociologists for Women in Society
574-310-9163
b.lalwani@gmail.com

Research: Living Spaces and Lifestyles Impact Chores More For Men Than Women

New article from Gender & Society Indicates that Women, Regardless of Location, Perform Significant Household Chores

Want more help at home? New data from leading researchers indicate that you may not be alone.

Dr. Natasha Quadlin, Assistant Professor at Ohio State University, and University of Maryland Assistant Professor Long Doan examined the dynamics of place – city, urban and rural settings – among heterosexual married individuals from the American Time Use Survey and the Current Population Survey to assess the role of place in the gendered division of household chores.

Their findings show that “urban men spend relatively little time on male-typed chores, but they spend the same amount of time on female-typed chores as their suburban and rural counterparts. This pattern suggests that urban men do not “step up” their involvement in female-typed tasks even though they contribute little in the way of other housework. In contrast, urbanicity rarely predicts women’s time use, implying that women spend considerable time on household chores regardless of where they live.”

These and other observations are published in their upcoming article, “Sex-Typed Chores and the City: Gender, Urbanicity and Housework.” The researchers show that lifestyles differ across urban, suburban and rural areas when it comes to time spent on household chores.

Why This Research Matters To The Public: Households in America

One of the most persistent findings in the housework literature is that chores are sex-typed. In other words, in heterosexual married couples, women take primary responsibility for some chores while men take primary responsibility for other chores. Although the exact tasks men and women do vary across couples, most studies consider “female-typed” chores to include cooking, doing dishes, cleaning, laundry, and grocery shopping, and “male-typed” chores to include auto maintenance, making repairs, and outdoor. Previous research acknowledges that female- and male-typed chores are attached to different schedules that dictate people’s time spent on these tasks. Studies show, for example, that female-typed chores are more routine than male-typed chores. Most female-typed chores must be performed daily or weekly, while male-typed chores are more irregular, thus contributing to gender differences in time spent on housework.

Despite this acknowledgement, until this study, virtually no research has considered how place is related to time spent on certain tasks. Urbanicity is an important factor because it structures people’s lifestyles and places special constraints on housework.

The article suggests that urban men’s and women’s time use indicates how partners contribute to household chores when there is less structural demand for the types of tasks they typically do. It has been long been held that people’s living spaces and lifestyles differ dramatically across urban, suburban and rural areas, which would mean that time spent on household chores also varies. The study finds that urban male and female time use provides insight into how partners contribute to household chores.

The study found that women are more likely to carry the burden of responsibility for household chores than one might think. The study found that women are still held responsible for the lion’s share of household responsibilities.

“We tend to think that men and women in urban areas are more likely to share household responsibilities,” said Dr. Natasha Quadlin, Assistant Professor at Ohio State University. “The research suggests that is not the case and that women are still largely responsible for household chores.”

Explaining Why Women Still Do More At Home

The most likely explanation for this pattern is that urban men resist female-typed housework because it is inherently intertwined with femininity. Authors note that since tasks such as cooking, cleaning, and laundry are considered “women’s work,” men do not spend additional time on these tasks even when they have great incentives to do so. Further, because female-typed chores account for most of partners’ time spent on housework, the researchers found that overall housework time does not significantly differ by place. Even when men are perhaps most willing and able to step up in female-typed chores, these findings suggest they do not.

Given the extent to which men resist female-typed chores, these findings help clarify the mechanisms underlying gender inequality in housework. Research points to many possible reasons women spend more time on chores than men, including the notion that wives generally earn less money than their husbands.

The article notes an alternative perspective—the “doing gender” perspective—resonates with feminist scholars because it characterizes housework as both cultivating and reinforcing models of gender. By doing sex-typed chores, men and women enact socially defined roles associated with masculinity and femininity. This study goes one step further and places a special emphasis on the role of abstention.

“Men, in other words, do gender not just by doing male-typed chores, but also by declining to do female-typed chores even when male-typed chores are structurally constrained,” the study notes.

The article will be published in the February edition of Gender & Society.

Further information

Gender & Society is a peer-reviewed journal, focused on the study of gender. It is the official journal of Sociologists for Women in Society, and was founded in 1987 as an outlet for feminist social science. Currently, it is a top-ranked journal in both sociology and gender studies. Gender & Society, a journal of Sage Publications, publishes less than seven percent of all papers submitted to it. For additional commentary, you can also read the Gender & Society blog and follow the journal on Twitter: @Gend_Soc.

Sociologists for Women in Society (SWS) to improve women’s lives through advancing and supporting feminist sociological research, activism and scholars. SWS is a nonprofit, scientific and educational organization with more than 1,000 members in the United States and overseas. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook: @socwomen and facebook.com/SocWomen.

#END RELEASE#

Click Here to Go Directly to the Article on the Gender & Society Page

SWS Distinguished Feminist Lecture By Mary J. Osirim Published in Gender & Society

SWS Distinguished Feminist Lecture: Feminist Politcal Economy in a Globalized World: African Women Migrants in South Africa and the United States

Mary Johnson Osirim, Bryn Mawr College, USA

January 17, 2019
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Media Contact:
Contact: Sheila B. Lalwani
Sociologists for Women in Society
(574) 310-9163 Sheila.b.lalwani@gmail.com

Migrant Women Are Active Economic Participants: New Study

African migrant women face considerable obstacles to economic participation, but they remain very active participants, new research indicates.

In her upcoming article, “Feminist Political Economy In a Globalized World: African Women Migrants in South Africa and the United States,” noted Africanist Dr. Mary Johnson Osirim, Professor of Sociology at Bryn Mawr College conducted research that spanned more than two decades on the economic experiences of migrant women. Her research considered the populations of African women in Zimbabwe and South Africa and African women in the northeastern U.S., particularly Boston and Philadelphia.

She followed the lives of migrants and found that African women – whether in Africa or the U.S. – represent a facet of globalization that is under-acknowledged. In considering the lives of women in Africa and the U.S., Osirim found that the challenges, while different, were met with creativity and resilience.

“What is most striking about these women,” she said, “is that they approached challenge with creativity and resilience. These are women who actively return to community and have played formidable roles in community development.”

The article will be published in the upcoming February edition of Gender & Society.

Further information

Gender & Society is a peer-reviewed journal, focused on the study of gender. It is the official journal of Sociologists for Women in Society, and was founded in 1987 as an outlet for feminist social science. Currently, it is a top-ranked journal in both sociology and gender studies. Gender

& Society, a journal of Sage Publications, publishes less than seven percent of all papers submitted to it. For additional commentary, you can also read the Gender & Society blog and follow the journal on Twitter: @Gend_Soc.

Sociologists for Women in Society (SWS) to improve women’s lives through advancing and supporting feminist sociological research, activism and scholars. SWS is a nonprofit, scientific and educational organization with more than 1,000 members in the United States and overseas. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook: @socwomen and facebook.com/SocWomen.

#END RELEASE#

Click For the Press Release 

Click Here to Go Directly to the Article on the Gender & Society Website.

SWS Social Actions Initiative Award Supports Isaí Ambrosio: Activist-in-Residence at UC Santa Cruz

Isaí Ambrosio: Activist-in-Residence

University of California Santa Cruz 

The application for this award was submitted by SWS Member, Sylvanna Falcón, Associate Professor of Latin American and Latino/a Studies, Director of the Research Center of Americas at the University of California Santa Cruz.

Please Click Here to Access the Article

SWS Member, Barbara Risman’s Research, Gender & Society Article, Cited in the New York Times

Attitudes and the Stalled Gender Revolution: Egalitarianism, Traditionalism, and Ambivalence from 1977 through 2016

By William J. Scarborough, Ray Sin, and Barbara Risman

Click Here to Access the Gender & Society Article, First Published November 8, 2018

Americans Value Equality at Work More Than Equality at Home

A study finds broad support for gender equality, but a disparity in people’s views of gender roles in public and private.

By Claire Cain Miller, December 3, 2018

Click Here to Access the New York Times Article

 

 

 

Photo Essay by SWS Treasurer-Elect, Veronica Montes, on Arrival of Migrant Caravan to Mexico City

Please Click Here to Access the Photo Essay by Veronica Montes that was recently published in Contexts.

Photo Essay on the arrival of the migrant caravan to Mexico City.

caravan, invasion, exodus: a photo essay by Veronica Montes

Left to right: A migrant’s backpack and donated blanket, Charging stations.

Left to right: Caravan, Invasion, Exodus., Inside the tents.

 

SWS Call for Applications for Campus Visit of 2017 SWS Distinguished Feminist Lecturer: Dr. Julia McQuillan

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS for 2017 SWS Distinguished Feminist Lecturer Awardee Campus Visit

Visitation Window: 2019
2017 SWS Distinguished Feminist Lecturer Awardee: Dr. Julia McQuillan

Sociologists for Women in Society (SWS) is delighted to acknowledge our 2017 Feminist Lecturer Awardee Dr. Julia McQuillan who is prepared to visit a campus in the coming months to meet with students and deliver a talk, entitled: “I just want to be a scientist”: Real life conundrums and institutionaltransformation.

Please Click Here to learn more about how to apply.

Deadline for Applications is: December 1, 2018.

Congratulations to the Newly Elected SWS Officers!

Congratulations to the following individuals who are the newly elected SWS Officers, Chairs, and Committee Members. The first four people below are new members of SWS Council. These individuals will officially begin their terms at the 2019 Winter Meeting in Denver, Colorado. These results were shared with SWS Membership on November 1, 2018. 
 
Josephine Beoku-Betts, President-Elect
 
Nancy López, Vice President
 
Roberta Villalón, Treasurer-Elect 
 
Jax Gonzalez, Student Representative 
 
Ruth Marleen Hernández, Social Action Committee Chair
 
Shauna A. Morimoto, Career Development Committee Chair
 
Sasha R. Drummond-Lewis, Sister to Sister Committee Co-Chair
 
Tanya Cook, Membership Committee Member
 
Daniela Jauk, Membership Committee Member
 
Vrushali Patil, Publications Committee Member
 
Yasemin Besen-Cassino, Publications Committee Member 
 
Victoria Reyes, Awards Committee Member 
 
Ophra Leyser-Whalen, Nominations Committee Member 
 
Shobha Hamal Gurung, Nominations Committee Member 
 
Thank you to all of you who ran for a position and thank you to all SWS Members who voted in the election. And, thank you to the SWS Nominations Committee Members, Abby Ferber (Chair), Mindy Fried, Denise A. Copelton, Maura Kelly, and Anna Muraco for all of their work in putting together such a wonderful group of candidates for elected office.   
 

SWS Condemns Trump Administration’s Move to Redefine Gender: ‘Transgender Rights are Human Rights’

 

SWS Condemns Trump Administration’s Move to Redefine Gender: ‘Transgender Rights are Human Rights’

Sociologists for Women in Society unequivocally rejects efforts by the Trump Administration to redefine gender in such a limited way. Mandating that individuals identify with a binary gender category that is based on their sex organs at birth rejects the social construction of gender, neglects the experiences of intersex people, and flies in the face of extensive research showing that gender is not so simplistically defined. Gender is not a biological construction. Transgender rights are human rights. And the Trump Administration’s attempts to ignore these facts will alienate many and set back hard-won gains.