ASA Annual Survey Results

The results are in! Inform your voting decision for the ASA election. Click on a candidate’s name to view their survey response:

View the PDF Version here

Responses to SWS Annual Survey of ASA Election Candidates

April 17th Draft

Candidates

President Elect: Mary Romero. 4

President Elect: Rogelio Saenz. 5

Vice President-Elect: Grace Kao. 6

Vice President-Elect: Bandana Purkayastha. 7

Committee on Publications: Mary Bernstein. 9

Committee on Publication: David Cunningham.. 11

Committee on Publications: Tyrone A. Forman. 12

Committee on Publications: Nancy A. Naples. 13

Committee on Publications: Abigail C. Saguy. 15

Committee on Publications: Regina E. Werum.. 16

Council Members-At Large: Rick A. Baldoz. 17

Council Members-At Large: Lisa D. Brush. 18

Council Members-At Large: Rodney D. Coates. 19

Council Members-At Large: Kimberly Ann Goyette. 20

Council Members-At Large: Erin Kelly. 21

Council Members-At Large: Anthony A. Peguero. 22

Council Members-At Large: Zulema Valdez. 24

Council Members-At Large: Rhys H. Williams. 25

Committee on Nominations: Joyce M. Bell 27

Committee on Nominations: Amy L. Best. 28

Committee on Nominations: Cedric de Leon. 29

Committee on Nominations: Mustafa Emirbayer. 31

Committee on Nominations: John Evans. 32

Committee on Nominations: Mark D. Hayward. 33

Committee on Nominations: Melissa A. Milkie. 34

Committee on Nominations: Brea Louise Perry. 35

Committee on Nominations: Diane L. Pike. 37

Committee on Nominations: Jake Rosenfeld. 38

Committee on Nominations: Virginia E. Rutter. 39

Members-At-Large: Enobong Branch. 40

Members-At-Large: Lorena Garcia. 41

Members-At-Large: Hedwig Eugenie Lee. 42

Members-At-Large: Zandria Felice Robinson. 43

MA-Granting Institutions: Jose Zapata Calderon. 44

MA-Granting Institutions: Marc W. Steinberg. 45

2-Year Institutions: David L. Levinson. 46

2-Year Institutions: Deidre A. Tyler. 47

 

President Elect: Mary Romero

Arizona State University

  1. Are you a member of SWS? YES
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

X    Gender & Society editorial board

X_    Attendance at Summer Meetings

X_    Attendance at Winter Meetings

_    Presentation at SWS Meetings

 If other service, please list:

Program Committee (2017), SWS Professional-Needs Mentoring Program, 2007-2008, Sister to Sister Task Force (2002-3), Feminist Activism Award Selection Committee (1995-6), Minority Fellowship Program Committee (1988-1990), Social Issues Committee (1988-1990);

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:
  • ASA, Council Liaison to the Committee on the Status of Women In Sociology
  • External Reviewer for numerous Promotion & Tenure
  • Mentoring women graduate students and asst and assoc professors (SWS, SSSP, PSA)
  • Advisory Committee, Justice in the Home conference at Barnard Center for Research on Women (2013-2014).
  • Research Member, International Domestic Workers Federation, Founding Congress, Montevideo, Uruguay (2013).
  • National Science Foundation Advance Mentor, Texas A&M University National Science foundation ADVANCE Scholar Program (2011-2013).
  • Member, Advisory Committee, National Domestic Worker Survey, National Domestic Workers Alliance (2010-2011).
  • Consultant, Maid in America, Impacto Films, www.MaidInAmericaTheDoc.com (2000-2005) 10 year follow-up (2015-present).
  • External Reviewer, AVoices from the Plant Floor,@ UCLA-LOSH, Center for Occupational and Environmental Health and the Center for Labor Research and Education within the Institute for Labor and Employment (2002
  • Mentor for recipient of the Social Science Research Council Latina Mentoring Program at the University of Southern California, Department

President Elect: Rogelio Saenz

University of Texas, San Antonio

  1. Are you a member of SWS?   NO
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

_    Gender & Society reviewer

_    Gender & Society editorial board

_    Attendance at Summer Meetings

_    Attendance at Winter Meetings

_    Presentation at SWS Meetings

 If other service, please list:

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

I have mentored, collaborated with, and hired many women over my career.  For example, I have chaired the dissertation committees of eight women, seven of these women of color.  In addition, I have served as chair of MS committees of eight women, seven of these women of color.  Furthermore, I have co-authored publications with 22 women since 2000.  Women have accounted for 60 percent of my co-authorships over the last 17 years.  Moreover, as Head of the Department of Sociology at Texas A&M University, I hired nine women and eight men as faculty members between 1996 and 2004.  As Dean of the College of Public Policy at the University of Texas at San Antonio, I have thus far hired ten women and eight men as faculty members between 2011 and 2017.  Finally, I have written an article on the labor market experience of Mexican women domestic workers; a book chapter on the wage determinants of Mexican immigrant women working along the U.S.-Mexico border; and three essays for popular audiences on the politics of reproductive rights and abortion in Texas, breast cancer mortality, and teen fertility.

Vice President-Elect: Grace Kao

University of Pennsylvania

  1. Are you a member of SWS?   NO
  1. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

_   Gender & Society reviewer

_    Gender & Society editorial board

_    Attendance at Summer Meetings

_    Attendance at Winter Meetings

_    Presentation at SWS Meetings

 If other service, please list:

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:
  • Activities at the University of Pennsylvania:
  • Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies Executive Board (2016-17).
  • Recipient, 25th Anniversary Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Advising. Trustees Council of Penn Women, 2015.
  • Faculty advisory board of the Trustees Council of Penn Women (2009-2017).
  • Penn School of Arts & Sciences Target of Opportunity Faculty Equity Committee (2005-2010).
  • One of 25 Penn women leaders honored by the Women in Leadership Series, 2008.

Vice President-Elect: Bandana Purkayastha

University of Connecticut

  1. Are you a member of SWS?  YES (since the 1990s)
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

y_    Gender & Society reviewer

_**    Gender & Society editorial board  (** I was the Deputy Editor of Gender & Society 2006-2011)

_y    Attendance at Summer Meetings

y_    Attendance at Winter Meetings

y_    Presentation at SWS Meetings

 If other service, please list:

  • President, SWS, 2013.  (During my term as President-Elect and President, apart from the normal work of any President, SWS’s executive office’s move twice.  These moves required significant work with lawyers, accountants and SWS-ers to ensure the stability of the organization).
  • I served on the EOB (now called executive council) as President Elect and Past President.
  • Oversaw the Nominations Committee’s work (as Past President).
  • Served on the Publications Committee.
  • As I noted above I was the Deputy Editor of Gender & Society
  • I have been a part the Sister-to Sister network since its inception.
  • I have served on numerous other committees over the last two decades.
  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:
  • I have worked formally and informally within professional organizations (SWS, ASA, ISA) to ensure that scholars—who are marginalized in these academic spaces—are included within professional networks, their voices are represented centrally and continually, and the structural conditions that lead to their marginalization are challenged and changed.
  • Within my university:  I have been formally recognized several times because of my contribution and leadership on women’s issues, especially those of women of color. This continues as my life’s work.  More recently, I have cracked some glass ceilings in my role as the first woman of color to head a major social department at my university.  Among other issues that promote social equality of women, as head, I have (often successfully) advocated for gender equity in pay, taken on the fight against sexual harassment and racism, and raised the total number of women as men of color in our department.  I have always worked to keep networks alive and active across racial, gender, sexuality, religious and nationality divides.
  • I have contributed to several community efforts (including on domestic violence) and was earlier recognized by the state of CT for my leadership on immigrant issues. I have worked on some state agency efforts  to ensure racial and sexual minorities were correctly represented in data gathering efforts.
  • My academic work continues to document and analyze intersecting structures that create marginalization and privilege. I have worked on migrants lives, religious minorities (in the US), racism, human rights (in the US) and violence and peace. I have been told my work has opened up spaces for the work of several outstanding sociologists and Women Studies scholars. Based on these work I have consulted with state agencies and international entities in their efforts to shape policies and practices that affect marginalized people.  Equally important, foregoing the academic rewards for sole-authorship, I have, and will continue to work with other scholars to uphold my commitment to the feminist principles of collaboration and co-learning.

I want to note that many of the contributions listed above could not have been achieved through my sole effort.  Many other people helped me achieve some of these objectives.  Even though I have not listed everyone’s names, I wish to acknowledge the collective effort in this journey for achieving equality for people who are marginalized in myriad ways.

Committee on Publications: Mary Bernstein

University of Connecticut

  1. Are you a member of SWS? YES
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

x_    Gender & Society reviewer

_    Gender & Society editorial board

x_    Attendance at Summer Meetings

x_    Attendance at Winter Meetings

x_    Presentation at SWS Meetings

 If other service, please list:

I served as President (including president-elect and past-president) of SWS.  I have been involved with SWS since I first became an assistant professor and learned of SWS.  I have participated in the organization in many capacities ever since. I have presented papers and/or served on panels and attended almost every meeting since I joined.  More importantly, Tracy Ore had the inspired idea to start the Social Action Committee and I was at the first meeting and helped the Committee to grow, develop fact sheets, and to become an important part of SWS.  I have served as a member of the program committee and done local arrangements for the SWS Winter meetings both in 2000-2001 and again in 2003-2004.  From 2004-2006, I served as secretary of SWS.  I became president-elect of SWS in 2013 and president in 2014.  I served as one of the deputy editors of Gender & Society from 2011 to 2015.

As SWS president, the 2014 Winter Meeting that I organized focused on gender and multi-institutional politics.

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

My younger years as an activist as well as my teaching, scholarship and service at the University of Connecticut (UConn), in the profession, and in the community have had a central focus on promoting social equality for women across race, sexual orientation, and gender identity.

My contributions to the promotion of social equality for women began in college with my work in the Sanctuary movement, toward divestment from South Africa and with Amnesty International.  Upon graduating college, I worked for the feminist organization, 9 to 5:  The National Association for Working Women on issues such as pay equity.  Working with these various social movement organizations sparked my scholarly interest in understanding the dynamics of collective action and social change.  Thus my scholarship has focused on understanding social change through a focus on the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) movement, the multi-racial Hapa movement, and Islamic movements in Turkey and LGBT activism in Turkey and Autralia. My publications have also examined the politics of family formation.  More recently I am examining the politics of racial backlash through a study of the tea party (with Malaena Taylor).  Another current research project involves examining how women with early breast cancer make decisions about their medical treatment.

In addition to my scholarship, I have had a long-term commitment to advancing the position of people of color, women, and LGBT people in the academy and to supporting a variety of activist efforts in this regard.

I have been involved in promoting women’s studies through my affiliation with Women’s Studies (4 years at Arizona State University and 12 years at UConn, including 6 years on the Women’s Studies Advisory Board).  I helped to rewrite the bylaws of the Women’s Studies Program (which has since become the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program) and to create a vision for the Program at UConn.  At UConn, I served as a member of the ALTERR committee– the Academic Leadership Team for Effective Recruiting and Retention– whose goal was to ensure that recruitment efforts at UConn did not disadvantage women and people of color and to create strategies for retaining women faculty and faculty of color once they were at UConn.  The Committee conducted training with every department in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences that was hiring to ensure that committees were aware of the subtle and not-so-subtle ways in which recruitment practices might disadvantage women and people of color.  When I served as Director of Graduate Studies in my department at UConn, I wrote and received a grant for graduate student recruitment and initiated an “Ambassador Program” designed to recruit and retain students of color.  The Ambassador Program, under my direction, was highly successful.  I also served as advisor from 2003 – 2012 to the UConn group, Allies and Queers Undergraduate Association (AQUA) as well as to the UConn group Queers United Against Discrimination (QUAD) and have been a guest speaker at various groups on campus, such as Graduate Queers, LGB graduate student association and the Rainbow Center.

At the professional-level, I served as Chair of the American Sociological Association’s Section on Sexualities and council members of the section on Collective Behavior and Social Movements.  In 2011-2012, I organized the ASA Section on the Sociology of Sexualities’s first mini-conference, entitled “Crossing Boundaries:  Workshopping Sexualities” where I helped to raise money to provide 24 grants to graduate students so that they could attend the conference.  I have also developed a lecture designed to help LGBT graduate students prepare for the job market entitled, “Going on the Market With A Lavender CV” which I have given at several professional meetings, including ASA and the Easterns.

I have also contributed to community efforts to promote social change regarding gender and sexual orientation through serving as a board member of the Arizona Human Rights Foundation and the Arizona Human Rights Fund and as a guest speaker in various community groups such as Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gay Men.

Finally, my teaching centers around educating students about inequality across various levels of analysis and the politics of social change.

Committee on Publication: David Cunningham

Washington University – St. Louis

  1. Are you a member of SWS?                No
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

_    Gender & Society reviewer

_    Gender & Society editorial board

_    Attendance at Summer Meetings

_    Attendance at Winter Meetings

_    Presentation at SWS Meetings

 If other service, please list:

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

All of the core courses that I teach incorporate significant consideration of gender and engage modes of contestation around gender-based inequities. My course on Social Movements in particular emphasizes historical and contemporary campaigns focused on social equality for women as well as women’s often under-acknowledged leadership roles in those (and other) campaigns. While my research does not engage women and gender as a primary focus, in a number of works I have examined the manner in which gendered understandings, experiences, and roles shape the broader dynamics of collective struggles.

Committee on Publications: Tyrone A. Forman

University of Illinois, Chicago

 

*Awaiting response

Committee on Publications: Nancy A. Naples

University of Connecticut

  1. Are you a member of SWS? YES
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

_x    Gender & Society reviewer

_x   Gender & Society editorial board

_x    Attendance at Summer Meetings

_ x   Attendance at Winter Meetings

_ x   Presentation at SWS Meetings

 If other service, please list:

Elected Offices

  • President, Sociologists for Women in Society, 2004-2005 (President-Elect 2003-2004;
    • Past President 2005-2006)
  • Vice President, Sociologists for Women in Society, 2001-2003
  • Chair, Discrimination Committee, Sociologists for Women in Society, 1997-2000
  • Other Service
  • Member, Program Committee, Conference on “Gender and Multi-Institutional Politics,” Sociologists for Women in Society, Winter Meetings, February 6-9, 2014
  • Members, Feminist Mentor Award Committee, Sociologists for Women in Society, 2012-2014
  • Member, Beth B. Hess Memorial Scholarship Committee, SWS/SSSP, 2012-present
  • Editorial Board, Gender & Society (2006-2009; 1993-1998)
  • Member, International Committee, Sociologists for Women in the Society, 2003-2005
  • Chair, Local Arrangements, Sociologists for Women in Society, Anaheim, California, August, 2001
  • Chair, Local Arrangements Committee, Sociologists for Women in Society, Mid-Year Meetings, Costa Mesa, California, February, 2000.
  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

This is a very challenging question. I do view my engagement as a feminist sociologist, teacher and mentor as focused on promoting social equity for women and others who have been marginalized in the academy and beyond.  The research questions I explore are directly motivated by this goal. At times the best I can do is try to better understand the dynamics of inequality, domination and resistance. Much of my efforts as a teacher includes designing courses that introduce students to critical thinking skills and feminist praxis. I also value opportunities to mentor women and LGBTQ students outside the classroom.  As a consultant I worked with Val Jenness on a co-authored study of the access of crime victims with disabilities to the criminal justice system in California. This three-year study was conducted with the support of a grant from California’s Department of Mental Health. Findings that the system fails to investigate criminal cases filed by people with disabilities contributed to a new section in the Penal Code that requires both local and state law enforcement agencies to investigate elder and dependent adult abuse and to provide support to the victim until the criminal phase of the investigation is complete. My earlier work as a social worker included designing, at the time, an innovative program to support low income pregnant teens and teen mothers as they negotiated access to adequate housing, health, and education, and family challenges including abuse and homelessness. As part of a larger movement in NYC, I worked with community-based organizations to advocate for the rights of these young women to complete their high school education and to be treated fairly by medical professionals and social welfare staff among others.  I also contributed to programs designed to train women in the construction trades.

Committee on Publications: Abigail C. Saguy

University of California, Los Angeles

 

*Awaiting response

Committee on Publications: Regina E. Werum

University of Nebraska, Lincoln

  1. Are you a member of SWS? YES

I joined SWS as a graduate student in 1990 and have been a member of the organization ever since.

  1. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

_    Gender & Society reviewer

_    Gender & Society editorial board

_    Attendance at Summer Meetings

_    Attendance at Winter Meetings

_    Presentation at SWS Meetings

If other service, please list:

I have attended SWS events associated with ASA meetings over the years and have occasionally served as a volunteer (e.g., meeting registration staff). Contributed to Hey Jane (2009).

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

I have a long history of mentoring peers and colleagues on didactic and pedagogical matters – especially concerning ways to teach and talk about potentially contentious issues surrounding gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity.  These are also my bread-and-butter courses at graduate and undergraduate levels.  At my current (and former) institution, I have held affiliated faculty status in WGS programs for two decades and I currently serve on the Awards and Scholarships Committee for my institution’s WGS program. As a result, I have had the privilege to mentor students from a broad range of fields and disciplines, who all share one thing in common: A commitment to gender studies, broadly defined, and to creating institutional and societal environments that help foster greater gender equity.

Council Members-At Large: Rick A. Baldoz

Oberlin College

  1. Are you a member of SWS? NO
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

_    Gender & Society reviewer

_    Gender & Society editorial board

_    Attendance at Summer Meetings

_    Attendance at Winter Meetings

_    Presentation at SWS Meetings

If other service, please list:

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

I integrate issues of gender inequality and persistence of patriarchy into my courses. I owe many intellectual debts to mentors/colleagues like Evelyn Nakano Glenn, Rhacel Parrenas, and Mary Romero, who have done cutting edge work on gendered inequalities.

Council Members-At Large: Lisa D. Brush

University of Pittsburgh

  1. Are you a member of SWS? YES
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

x    Gender & Society reviewer

x    Gender & Society editorial board

x    Attendance at Summer Meetings

x    Attendance at Winter Meetings

x    Presentation at SWS Meetings

 If other service, please list:

I have chaired or co-chaired the Discrimination Committee, the Awards Committee, and the Publications Committee. As Co-Chair of the Publications Committee, I led the effort to negotiate the contract to publish Gender & Society and to conduct the search for Editor of the journal.

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

My research, teaching, and service to department, university, and discipline are all directed toward promoting social equality for women, at least under those circumstances where I think social equality is the best we can do (I would hope in the long run to undermine the gender and homo/hetero binaries and various essentialisms that naturalize both difference and dominance). I have chaired committees that have successfully hired, contracted, promoted, and tenured women. In addition to reviewing journal submissions by and about women, gender, and sexuality, I have reviewed book proposals and manuscripts for presses, research proposals and technical reports for federal funding agencies, and course and curriculum proposals related to research on gender and sexuality.

Council Members-At Large: Rodney D. Coates

Miami University

  1. Are you a member of SWS? 
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.
  3. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/before-rosa-claudette-mother-civil-rights-movement-rodney-coates

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/cathy-williams-buffalo-soldier-rodney-coates

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/myth-happy-slave-reality-its-endurance-rodney-coates

Council Members-At Large: Kimberly Ann Goyette

Temple University

  1. Are you a member of SWS? NO
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

X_    Gender & Society reviewer

_    Gender & Society editorial board

_    Attendance at Summer Meetings

_    Attendance at Winter Meetings

_    Presentation at SWS Meetings

 If other service, please list:

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

I have mentored many women graduate students, one of whom has gone on to a tenure-track position, and others have found careers outside of academia.  As chair of my department, I try to balance committees and hiring by gender to the extent I can. I also try to encourage a family-friendly workplace and flexibility in work to accommodate family situations.

Council Members-At Large: Erin Kelly

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

  1. Are you a member of SWS? NO (past member, but lapsed)
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

X    Gender & Society reviewer

_    Gender & Society editorial board

_    Attendance at Summer Meetings

X    Attendance at Winter Meetings

X    Presentation at SWS Meetings

 If other service, please list:

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

Questions about gender, work, and family are central to my research agenda. I have a stream of research that investigates how work organizations address inequality and “promote diversity and inclusion,” including asking what policies, practices, and discourses are, at best, “window dressing” and what actually diversifies the management pool by increasing the share of white women, black women, black men, and other underrepresented minorities. Another stream of research examines how family leaves and flexibility policies are implemented in a variety of workplaces and how gender policing discourages men’s use of these officially-available policies. My recent work dives deeper into workplace flexibility using multi-method studies of organizational initiatives that try to move away from flexibility as a negotiated accommodation (which is more often sought by women and often affirms their marginalization in the organization) to work redesigned to address both organizational goals and all workers’ personal and family lives. A central question in that work is whether workplace flexibility (and which approaches and policies) challenge or exacerbate gender inequality. A recent collaboration studied work practices in nursing homes and I hope to do more research with lower-wage care workers. I have shared my research with many audiences, including the popular press, business press, managers of all types, and in policy briefings. My university service has included working on task forces on these issues, including chairing the Women’s Faculty Cabinet at the University of Minnesota.

Council Members-At Large: Anthony A. Peguero

Virginia Tech University

  1. Are you a member of SWS? NO
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

_    Gender & Society reviewer

_    Gender & Society editorial board

_    Attendance at Summer Meetings

_    Attendance at Winter Meetings

_    Presentation at SWS Meetings

 If other service, please list:

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

Given that the United States is becoming more diverse and globally interconnected, addressing the inequities due to race, ethnicity, immigration and gender are imperative. Establishing and sustaining socially just practices and policies in United States institutions, such as schools and the justice system, to ensure democracy and opportunities for youth is vital. The need to better understand the causes and consequences of inequality for marginalized young people drives my current and future program of research. It is essential to link sociological research on stratification and inequality, criminological research on the risk and protective factors of violence, and educational research on achievement and attainment in order to facilitate access and success for these youth. Thus, my research interests involve youth violence and juvenile justice, youth socialization and marginalization, gender, race and ethnicity, and the adaptation of the children immigrants. One major emphasis of my research program explores how violence contributes to the racial, ethnic, and gender inequalities apparent within the United States educational system. A second, related, area for me is exploring the barriers and challenges faced by the rapidly growing number of youth in immigrant families. I serve as a consultant on the Cartoon Network’s campaign against bullying, co-editor of Sociology Compass, Crime and Deviance Section, and the editorial board for the journal of Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice, Sociology of Race and Ethnicity, and Journal of Criminal Justice. I am also a National Institute Justice W.E.B. Du Bois Fellow and a member of the Racial Democracy, Crime, and Justice Network which holds the dual goals of advancing research on the intersection of race, crime and justice and of promoting racial democracy within the study of these issues by supporting junior scholars from under-represented groups. Being an effective teacher is an essential characteristic towards being a strong scholar. There are two key dimensions of my teaching profile: being an educator and mentor. As an educator, I emphasize a collective perception that this is “our class,” with learning as a cooperative and shared endeavor. Within a social science classroom, it is imperative to learn and share our different sociological and cultural views of the social world with one another. Although it is my responsibility to foster an environment that promotes an open dialogue in “our” classroom, I emphasize the responsibility of all participants in cooperative learning. To date, I have taught Sociology of Law, Introduction to Sociology, Victims, Society, and Justice, Criminology, Juvenile Delinquency, Introduction to Criminal Justice, Systems of Justice, Immigration and Social Justice, Schools, Violence, and Justice, and Women and Crime courses. As a mentor, it is important to advise, guide, and work along with undergraduate and graduate students in developing their critical thinking and research skills. More importantly, I also believe that co-authoring with undergraduate and graduate students is a vital aspect of my teaching. To date, I have, or am currently in the process of, co-authoring with undergraduate and graduate students, who are often minority scholars. As for the possibility of being ASA Council Member-at-Large, I will continue the prior and current efforts towards making the ASA a more inclusive and representative organization.

Council Members-At Large: Zulema Valdez

University of California, Merced

  1. Are you a member of SWS? NO
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

X    Gender & Society reviewer

_    Gender & Society editorial board

_    Attendance at Summer Meetings

_    Attendance at Winter Meetings

_    Presentation at SWS Meetings

 If other service, please list:

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

Thank you for the opportunity to respond to your survey. My research uses an intersectional approach to study entrepreneurship, the labor market, and social inequality. I have published work that explicitly focuses on the intersection of race, class, and gender in shaping the life chances of individuals and collectivities within interlocking systems of capitalism, patriarchy, and white supremacy, in an effort to raise awareness of and develop policy prescriptions to affect change. I am also a member of the Race, Class, & Gender ASA Section. As a tenured associate professor of sociology, I mentor undergraduate, graduate, and assistant professor women of color at UC Merced, an Hispanic-Serving Institution in the Central Valley, a low-resource, rural, Mexican-origin majority-region of California. I also mentor several women of color outside of UC Merced, virtually and on-site at the annual ASA meeting. Finally, in the recent past and in the coming year, I volunteer to teach classes at Central California Women’s Facility in Chowchilla, CA, the largest women’s prison in the country, in an effort to improve incarcerated women’s well-being.

Council Members-At Large: Rhys H. Williams

Loyola University, Chicago

  1. Are you a member of SWS? NO
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

X_    Gender & Society reviewer

_    Gender & Society editorial board

_    Attendance at Summer Meetings

_    Attendance at Winter Meetings

X_    Presentation at SWS Meetings

(Paper coauthored with a graduate student)

 If other service, please list:

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

I have tried to be committed, throughout my career, to opening sociology beyond what was for decades its classed, raced, and gendered home.  I have expressed that commitment in three ways: a) as a supervisor and mentor for graduate students: b) as a journal editor and author with a reasonable publication record; c) and as a department chair.

  1. a) Perhaps the key way to transform the discipline is through training the next generations of professional sociologists. In responding to this survey, I went back through my records of working on graduate student MA and PhD committees. To the best of my ability to reconstruct, I have been on a total of 70 distinct MA or PhD committees in my career, 38 of them for women, 32 for men.  Of PhD committees only, I have been on 30 for women (of which I chaired 11), and 19 for men (of which I chaired 9). Of the MA committees, 8 have been for women (3 as chair), and 13 have been for men, (8 as chair).  Most of my own research has not been on gender, although I have published a few things (in the sociology of religion) that have focused on women’s lives, or men’s lives.  Because of my interest in religion and inequality, I have had several students who have pursued dissertations focused on gender and sexuality, as well as race, with as chair. Thus, it is not too surprising that I have drawn a number of women and people of color as graduate students.  It is also true that at two of the three universities where I have worked, tenured men far outnumbered tenured women on the faculty, so some women graduate students even outside my core scholarly areas, sought to work with me.  I work very hard at not just chairing a committee, but also acting as a mentor – discussing professional issues, navigating the job market, strategizing about publication, helping to craft application letters, etc.
  1. b) A number of my women doctoral students have become co-authors, first of conference papers, then of articles, or most recently, a book. In two cases, we have become co-authors on material that came from the student’s dissertation or thesis, and I was second author.  In the other cases, I invited them to be co-authors on papers emerging from my own research – and now have a book proposal under review for which the co-author is a former graduate student.  In each case, I am conscious of fostering a trajectory for the student where she begins as a co-author on my research, then transitions into first author of her own work.  Given the extent to which women’s work is under-credited, managing this transition is an important topic of mentoring conversations.

(I am not claiming, of course, that co-authoring is a selfless act – just that I make conscious efforts to offer those opportunities to younger scholars who are women or people of color).

In addition to co-authorship, I have worked diligently to organize panels for professional conferences that are inclusive, but geared particularly to early career scholars who are women or people of color.  For example, as chair this year of the ASA section on Political Sociology, I used my ‘chair’s session’ for an invited panel that includes two women who are post-docs, and a woman who is an assistant professor.  I actually had hoped to make it a panel with all untenured women, but the last person on the panel had to withdraw (I was able to replace with a doctoral student of one of my colleagues).

Further, I was conscious of offering publishing opportunities, especially to early career women, in my role as editor of two different journals (Social Problems; Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion).  Any examination of my time as editor of either of those journals will show the significant representation of women authors, and articles about gender and women’s lives.

  1. c) Finally, as department chair for two different departments, I made conscious efforts ensuring that service obligations were distributed equitably among the faculty (in particular, that senior men did their share), and that teaching assignments and times were made clearly and fairly. Moreover, I particularly prided myself on mentoring faculty toward promotion – whether to Associate with tenure or to Full. In a couple cases, I felt the younger professors in my department had not gotten good/much advice from their dissertation advisors and I was committed to helping correct that.  I will also note that as a member of both the Collective Behavior/Social Movements and Sociology of Religion sections of the ASA I have been involved in the sections’ mentoring activities – in each case working with an untenured woman scholar.  Two of them are tenured now, I am pleased to say, and a third just had her book published.

In sum, having repeatedly seen how important sponsorship is to a career, and how often women get less direct help or advice, I have worked with my own students, with younger faculty colleagues, and with younger women scholars in my research areas to try to provide that kind of help.

Committee on Nominations: Joyce M. Bell

University of Minnesota

 

 *Awaiting response

Committee on Nominations: Amy L. Best

George Mason University

 

*Awaiting response

Committee on Nominations: Cedric de Leon

Providence College

Are you a member of SWS? YES

  1. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

_    Gender & Society reviewer

_    Gender & Society editorial board

_    Attendance at Summer Meetings

_    Attendance at Winter Meetings

_    Presentation at SWS Meetings

If other service, please list: volunteered for the Career Development committee

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

Thank you for including me. I contribute to the promotion or social equality of women through my teaching, on-campus activism, my research, and hiring and recruitment.

Teaching. Women and gender feature prominently in the theory sequence I teach. Emma Goldman has equal time in my classical theory course as Marx, for example, and the second half of the course urges an intersectional analysis of the social dislocations under global capitalism. My contemporary theory course examines the ways in which education reproduces gender inequality in the college curriculum and the dating scene. I am also a mentor to several junior scholars who are women, and, as a man of color, attempt to co-navigate systemic marginalization within the academy whether in the job market or in tenure and promotion.

Activism. I have been a vocal advocate of women’s and LGBTQ rights on campus. Providence College (PC), where I work, is a conservative Catholic institution that has banned the Vagina Monologues on campus and does not offer access to birth control pills or condoms in their health center. Also while PC had a non-discrimination policy on sexual orientation in admissions, it reserved the right until recently to discriminate in hiring. I have struggled alongside students to challenge these retrograde policies. For example, I helped to successfully push for adding sexual orientation to the non-discrimination statement in hiring.

Research. I can and should do more on this front. I have begun doing so in a working paper on the political sociology of race, in which my co-author and I argue that the feminist sociology of the state and social movements (e.g., Orloff, Robnett) offers clues on how to theorize race and politics as inseparable.

Hiring and Recruitment. My most concrete achievement in this area has been in the recruitment of women to Providence College. When I arrived in the sociology department, only three of the nine faculty members were women, two of whom were tenured. Now, as a result of searches that I chaired, six out of the nine faculty members are women, and four of them are tenured.

*

A female graduate student, Amanda Mireles, recently told me, “Behind every ‘woke’ man is a tired feminist.” I couldn’t agree more, and I thank you for pushing me to account for my politics. Again, I can and should do more, and if given the chance, I will start by being your ally on the ASA nominations committee. Many thanks again for including me in this survey. If you require any further information, please feel free to reach out to me at cdeleon@providence.edu.

 

In solidarity,

Cedric

Committee on Nominations: Mustafa Emirbayer

University of Wisconsin, Madison

  1. Are you a member of SWS? NO  I am not
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

_    Gender & Society reviewer

_    Gender & Society editorial board

_    Attendance at Summer Meetings

_    Attendance at Winter Meetings

_    Presentation at SWS Meetings

 If other service, please list:

 

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

I have mentored many women graduate students and helped them realize their aims, whether inside or outside the academy.  Women graduate students I’ve worked with have gone on to work in NGOs or in community activism; teaching positions in major research universities, teaching positions in fine liberal arts colleges, and jobs in university administration.  Work on which I’ve advised them has deployed all different kinds of sociological methods, including fieldwork-based ethnography; interviews; quantitative statistical analysis; and comparative historical inquiry.  Work I’ve advised by both women and men has squarely taken on issues and topics relating to social equality for women, whether it be stress and poor health outcomes for black women professionals; the problem of nuisance laws that impose penalities on women experiencing domestic abuse; or patriarchal gender relations in the early days of hip-hop.  I’ve always given my best to see to it that important research questions having to do with gender inequality are addressed and also that women students flourish both while doing their work and after they have completed their degree.  

Committee on Nominations: John Evans

University of California,

  1. Are you a member of SWS? No
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

_    Gender & Society reviewer

_    Gender & Society editorial board

_    Attendance at Summer Meetings

_    Attendance at Winter Meetings

_    Presentation at SWS Meetings

 If other service, please list:

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

In Departmental hiring and graduate student recruitment I have tried to work on achieving gender equity.  I have tried to do the same in my administrative roles as first chair of the Department and later as Associate Dean of the Division of Social Science.

Committee on Nominations: Mark D. Hayward

University of Texas, Austin

 

*Awaiting response

Committee on Nominations: Melissa A. Milkie

University of Toronto

  1. Are you a member of SWS? YES
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

X    Gender & Society reviewer

X_    Gender & Society editorial board

X_    Attendance at Summer Meetings

X_    Attendance at Winter Meetings

X    Presentation at SWS Meetings

I HAVE PARTICIPATED IN ALL OF THE ABOVE

If other service, please list:

I WAS DEPUTY EDITOR OF GENDER & SOCIETY, 2011-2015

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

My research, service and mentoring have long focused on social equality for women. Much of my research speaks to issues of gender inequality; a central focus is on the mental health consequences of gendered work-family structures and culture. Recent projects include examining cultural patterns such as the distorted frame of the “Mommy Wars” in news media; examining the culture of father involvement over the past century, assessing work-to-family conflict and time pressures for partners’ and parents’ health, and examining Syrian refugee mothers’ mental health.

At University of Maryland, I served as a National Science Foundation (NSF) ADVANCE Professor of Inclusive Excellence, working to support and promote women and faculty of color in their careers. At University of Toronto, as Chair of the Graduate Department, I have worked to incorporate statements of diversity into our admissions procedures and other aspects of the graduate program.

Throughout my career, I have focused extensively on mentoring women students and students of color as they earned their Ph.D.s and helped them to achieve their ideal jobs. Moreover, I have mentored junior faculty women and faculty of color throughout my career.

Committee on Nominations: Brea Louise Perry

Indiana University

  1. Are you a member of SWS? YES
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

X    Gender & Society reviewer

_    Gender & Society editorial board

_    Attendance at Summer Meetings

_    Attendance at Winter Meetings

_    Presentation at SWS Meetings

 If other service, please list:

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

I am committed to publishing research that promotes equality for women and girls and identifies mechanisms of gender disparities in health and education. My work has addressed a variety of social problems relating to gender, including the health consequences of women’s disproportionate responsibility for cultivating and maintaining social ties, the punishment of Black girls in public schools for behavior that violates norms of femininity, and Black women’s experiences of sexism and racism at the intersection of gender and race. I have also argued for the meaningful inclusion of gender theory in research on the genetics of complex diseases.

Representative publications in medical sociology:

  • Perry, Brea L. 2016. “Gendering genetics: Biological contingencies in the protective effects of social integration for men and women.” American Journal of Sociology 121:1655-96.
  • Perry, Brea L., Bernice A. Pescosolido, Kathleen Bucholz, Howard Edenberg, John Kramer, Samuel Kuperman, Marc Alan Schuckit, and John I. Nurnberger, Jr. 2013. “Gender-specific gene-environment interaction in alcohol dependence: The impact of daily life events and GABRA2” Behavior Genetics 43:402-14.
  • Perry, Brea L. 2014. “Where is the gender in behaviour genetics? The need for social epidemiology in research on gene-environment interactions.” Open Access Genetics 1(1):8.
  • Perry, Brea L., Erin Pullen, and Carrie B. Oser. 2012. “Too much of a good thing? Psychosocial resources, gendered racism, and suicidal ideation among low-socioeconomic status African American women.” Social Psychology Quarterly 75:334-59.
  • Perry, Brea L., Kathi L.H. Harp, and Carrie B. Oser. 2013. “Racial and gender discrimination in the stress process: Implications for African American women’s health and wellbeing.” Sociological Perspectives 56:25-48. PMID: 24077024.

Representative publications in the sociology of education:

  • Morris, Edward and Brea L. Perry. 2017. “Girls behaving badly? Race, gender, and subjective evaluation in the discipline of African American girls.” Sociology of Education 90:127-48.
  • Perry, Brea L., Edward Morris, Tanja Link, and Carl Leukefeld. 2016. “From athletes to astrophysicists: Gender differences in patterns and predictors of career aspirations in pre-adolescence.” Social Sciences 5:1-17.
  • Perry, Brea L., Tanja Link, Christina Boelter, and Carl Leukefeld. 2012. “Blinded to science: Gender differences in the effects of race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status on academic and science attitudes among sixth graders.” Gender and Education 25:1-19.

Outside of my professional life, I also engage in a variety of volunteer activities that contribute to prosocial development and increase life chances for girls from low socioeconomic status backgrounds. I am a big sister for the Big Brothers Big Sisters organization, I have coached community soccer and volleyball for Girls, Inc., and I have served as a qualified scientific mentor to girls in local high schools completing independent social science projects.

Committee on Nominations: Diane L. Pike

Augsberg College

  1. Are you a member of SWS? NO
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

_    Gender & Society reviewer

_    Gender & Society editorial board

_    Attendance at Summer Meetings

_    Attendance at Winter Meetings

_    Presentation at SWS Meetings

 If other service, please list:

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

For some reason, SWS never really came on my radar during grad school or since nor was I ever recruited by anyone, although I know many members and highly respect the group’s work and MSWS as well. I feel like all my professional work is grounded in social equality for all genders,but I do not have any research projects in this area. Primarily, I have committed myself to multiple leadership roles and been thoughtful about issues of gender (and my gender) in that work (President of MSS; Chair of ASA COPES, Teaching Award Committee, Committee on Sections, Editor of TRAILS, first author on new guide).

Committee on Nominations: Jake Rosenfeld

Washington University – St. Louis

  1. Are you a member of SWS? NO
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

_    Gender & Society reviewer

_    Gender & Society editorial board

_    Attendance at Summer Meetings

_    Attendance at Winter Meetings

_    Presentation at SWS Meetings

 If other service, please list:

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

My research focuses on the causes and consequences of inequality along various dimensions, including gender.  For example, a current project explores the role that pay secrecy rules at work disadvantage women workers and contribute to the gender pay gap.  This research is especially relevant today as numerous states and localities are contemplating policy responses to employers that bar employees from asking about other workers’ pay.

A completed project investigated how the decline of labor unions has contributed to widening racial pay gaps, especially among women workers.  African-American women’s union participation rates once were twice as large as white women’s, which helped narrow racial wage disparities.  The decline of organized labor has contributed to approximately 20-33% of the increase in racial wage inequality among women workers.

Committee on Nominations: Virginia E. Rutter

Framingham State University

  1. Are you a member of SWS? YES.  I have been an SWS member since 1994.
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

_    Gender & Society reviewer YES

_    Gender & Society editorial board YES

_    Attendance at Summer Meetings YES

_    Attendance at Winter Meetings YES

_    Presentation at SWS Meetings YES

 If other service, please list:

I was a Media Committee member for five years. For two years I wrote and promoted Gender & Society press releases to get our stories to the public.

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

I do intensive work translating feminist social science to media most recently through The Society Pages and through the Council on Contemporary Families. I have in the past done many workshops to teach other feminist scholars how to get their work out to broader audiences and how to deal with hostile communities.

I work mentoring students at Framingham State as undergraduate research assistants and as Council on Contemporary Families public affairs interns, and I have done this for the past eight years. The content of the work that I do with my interns has a focus on gender equality as well as intersecting concerns such as social justice and equality for students of color and working class students. These mentorships are also focused on empowerment of women and students of color. In my work supporting other public sociologists and in my own work, I promote public understanding of intersectional visions of social equality for women.

In addition, I am Vice President of my campus faculty union and sit on the state-wide board for our MTA-affiliated union. Within the union I have recently worked on a gender equity study and facilitated state-wide involvement (through three other campus chapters of our union) with our Framingham State #BlackLivesMatter week-long teach-in in 2016.

I agreed to run for the ASA nominations to committee because I am eager to expand upon ASA’s values of diversity and inclusion in cultivating leaders from a wide range of institutions and identities.

Members-At-Large: Enobong Branch

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

  1. Are you a member of SWS? YES
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

X    Gender & Society reviewer

_    Gender & Society editorial board

X    Attendance at Summer Meetings

X    Attendance at Winter Meetings

_    Presentation at SWS Meetings

 If other service, please list:

Program Committee Chair, SWS Winter Meeting 2018

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

My research focuses on inequality by race, class, and gender and by extension my service to my campus and in other organizations aims to fostering equity and challenge inequality where I encounter it.

Members-At-Large: Lorena Garcia

University of Illinois, Chicago

  1. Are you a member of SWS? YES
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply (Yes, participated in all activities).

X_    Gender & Society reviewer

X_    Gender & Society editorial board

X    Attendance at Summer Meetings

X    Attendance at Winter Meetings

X    Presentation at SWS Meetings

If other service, please list:

I have also served as co-chair of SWS Sister-to-Sister Committee (2014-2016)

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

I have consistently contributed to the promotion or social equality for women through my research, teaching, and service work. For instance, I have participated on a youth advisory board for a Chicago-based organization servicing Latinas. Most recently, I served on a campus-wide search committee for the director position of the UIC Women’s Leadership and Research Center, and I’ve mentored a number of young women of color in our Summer Research Opportunity Program (SROP) here at UIC.

 Members-At-Large: Hedwig Eugenie Lee

University of Washington

  1. Are you a member of SWS? NO
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

_    Gender & Society reviewer

_    Gender & Society editorial board

_    Attendance at Summer Meetings

_    Attendance at Winter Meetings

_    Presentation at SWS Meetings

 If other service, please list:

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

On important dimension of my research focuses on understanding the role of chronic stress in producing health disparities, with a particular focus on women on color. For example, my current work examines the health impacts of family member incarceration for women left behind to take care of family member both inside and outside of the prison system. These women are often ignored in conversations around mass incarceration. But there are many women like Venida Browder (mother of Kalief Browder) who suffer real health impacts as a consequence of bearing the monstrous load of taking care of family members behind bars. I also work with several community groups whose aim is to bring attention to and empower women that are experiencing family member incarceration.

Members-At-Large: Zandria Felice Robinson

Rhodes College

  1. Are you a member of SWS? NO
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

_    Gender & Society reviewer

_    Gender & Society editorial board

x    Attendance at Summer Meetings

x    Attendance at Winter Meetings

x    Presentation at SWS Meetings

 If other service, please list:

Served on SWS Strategic Planning Committee, 2011-2013 

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

In addition to work in the classroom and service in other professional sociological organizations to advance the status of women in those organizations, one major initiative I participated in to promote social equality for all women was BRAVE—Bridging Resources to Achieve Victories in Education. This was a multi-year grant from the Tennessee Board of Regents in collaboration with SisterReach, the reproductive justice organization in my area, that used a reproductive justice approach to training women of color in college and ensuring they had the networks and resources to be successful in and beyond college. This grant helped SisterReach build programming that improved the status of women in the greater Memphis community.

MA-Granting Institutions: Jose Zapata Calderon

Pitzer College

  1. Are you a member of SWS? I am a member of the Race, Gender, and Class section
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

_    Gender & Society reviewer

_    Gender & Society editorial board

_    Attendance at Summer Meetings

_    Attendance at Winter Meetings

_    Presentation at SWS Meetings

 If other service, please list:

Have attended sessions, particularly of Race, Gender, and Class and Sex & Gender over the years.

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women: 

Over the years, I have served on numerous ASA committees, including working alongside Patricia Hill Collins and Margaret Anderson on the ASA Program Committee for 2009,  with principles in the forefront of ensuring the voice and representation of women, people of color, and LGBTQ communities.  Over the years, with these principles in the forefront  I served on the Minority Opportunity School Transformation Program (MOST); participated as a recipient  and sustainer of the Minority Fellowship Program (MFP);  engaged as one of the founders of the ASA Latina and Latino Studies Section (President-elect in 2006); served on the Los Angeles County Board of Education from 2013-2015; and serving presently on the steering committee of the College for all Coalition, composed of over 50 diverse organizations that is leading the implementation of historic education legislation (SB-1050) to improve college access and readiness for all California students and especially students who are low income, English learners, or foster youth.  In my community work, over the years, I have helped in the election of numerous women to political office including Judy Chu (first as Mayor of Monterey Park and now as a Congresswoman) and Eloise Gomez-Reyes (recently elected to the California State Assembly).   For this work and the practice of these principles over the years, I received various awards including:  the Ambassador Nathaniel and Elizabeth Davis Civil Rights Legacy Award; the “Dreamkeeper Award” from the California Alliance of African American Educators; the California Campus Compact Richard E. Cone Award for Excellence and Leadership in Cultivating Community Partnerships in Higher Education; the Goddess of Pomona Award from the City of Pomona, the Michi and Walter Weglyn Chair in Multicultural Studies at Cal Poly University, Pomona; and the United Farm Worker’s Union “Si Se Puede” award.

MA-Granting Institutions: Marc W. Steinberg

Smith College

  1. Are you a member of SWS? NO
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

_    Gender & Society reviewer

_    Gender & Society editorial board

_    Attendance at Summer Meetings

_    Attendance at Winter Meetings

_    Presentation at SWS Meetings

 If other service, please list:

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

I have taught for 20+ years at a women’s college.

2-Year Institutions: David L. Levinson

Norwalk Community College

  1. Are you a member of SWS? NO
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

_    Gender & Society reviewer

_    Gender & Society editorial board

_    Attendance at Summer Meetings

_    Attendance at Winter Meetings

_    Presentation at SWS Meetings

If other service, please list: 

I recently co-chaired the ASA Task Force on Community College Faculty, whose respondents were 65% women.  Three articles appeared in the October 2016 issue of “Teaching Sociology,” which include a number of findings related to the impact of gender.  Also have been involved extensively in the Society for the Study of Social Problems engaged in a number of pursuits that subsume gender equality.

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

All of my work centers on the social equality of women.  As president of a college whose student population is 60% women, I’ve championed a Women’s Study concentration as part of our Liberal Arts and Science program, supported a Fairfield County Women’s Center on campus, and have worked extensively with Fairfield County’s Community Foundation Fund for Women and Girls with respect to program development. 

2-Year Institutions: Deidre A. Tyler

Salt Lake Community College

  1. Are you a member of SWS? YES
  2. If yes, have you participated in any of the following SWS activities: check all that apply.

_    Gender & Society reviewer

_    Gender & Society editorial board

_    Attendance at Summer Meetings

_    Attendance at Winter Meetings

_    Presentation at SWS Meetings

 If other service, please list:

Always giving presentations teaching women how to use technology in their classrooms.

  1. Please describe any contributions you have made to the promotion or social equality for women:

I live in Utah and I serve on the Utah Heath Advisory council.  In this role I am always advocating for the health services that women need so badly.